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This surprisingly crisp, vibrant print film (so clean you’d think it was shot yesterday) is a real oddity.

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The main selling point is top billed Jamie Gillis, looking particularly underfed and doughy in one of his earliest film appearances.  As oversexed cabbie “Max Dizzy”, he’s given little to do save mug for the camera and spout rapid fire nonsensical chatter.  

We also get Rita Bennett, who’d go on to bit parts in All That Jazz and Raging Bull, but who is probably better known for a series of Something Weird released sexploiters including The Love Cult, P.P.S., the Sex Killer, Professor Lust and the Cramps-celebrated Confessions of a Psycho Cat.  Hardly a big name draw, but next to Gillis, she has the most lengthy and recognizable credits of the cast (particularly at the time of filming, where she stands out as the sole cinematic veteran).

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Darby Lloyd Rains shows up as a stewardess who pays her cab fare with her body, and Nicole Vadim of the Eighteen Carat Virgin shows up as well, but that’s about it on the distaff end.  

Just to make things seriously bizarre, of all people Allan Shackleton, former partner of Roberta Findlay and he producer of both Snuff and Joe Sarno’s Misty, shows up for his sole onscreen “acting” credit.  Whew.

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Not unexpectedly, this weird hard-R / soft-X comedy was the sole effort from director Robert Steiner and the better part of the cast, most of whom are rather strange looking – how many of you can claim with a straight face that you actually wanted to see any of these people in the buff?

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Men leave their tighty-whiteys on during the act, and the ladies may play with themselves a bit, but you never see any actual penetration or what have you, which leaves Flying Acquaintances as a frustrating head scratcher for the hardcore crowd, but far too close to porn for the softcore crowd.  

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Worse, there’s no actual plot, and the whole thing is played up as one big joke. It’s really no surprise Steiner disappeared after this one.   Nuff said.

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